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1st Grade Learning Progression (v2)

Page history last edited by Christine Koerner 2 years, 5 months ago

Welcome to the new progression for 1st Grade. This progression builds upon Math Framework Project Phase 1 work (see Progression v1 here), taking many of the best features and building in an Overarching Question, Essential Questions, and Big Ideas for each unit. This new model takes the work of bundling standards to the next level by grouping together grade level concepts under Big Ideas. The Big Ideas are designed to represent the critical mathematics of this grade level in a manner we believe to be more coherent and productive as a guide for planning instruction, assessment, and intervention. Big Ideas are not a replacement for the objectives. 

 

Click on the unit numbers below to see essential understandings, student activities, and suggested sequencing.

 

The use of an asterisk (*) indicates an objective is repeated in another unit or an objective that is partially taught in a unit and will be taught in its entirety in a later unit.  

 

**The teacher will provide opportunities to reinforce objectives in a bundled (or connected) manner through class meetings/calendar time, small group activities, and teacher led math stations.

 

Unit

Overarching Question

Essential Questions

Big Ideas

Full Objectives

Unit 0:

Growth Mindset

 


Timing

1-2 weeks


 

 

How does mindset affect learning mathematics?  
  1. Math is about learning, not about performing.
  2. Math is about making sense.
  3. Math is filled with conjectures, creativity, and uncertainty.
  4. Mistakes are beautiful things.
  • Develop a deep and flexible conceptual understanding
  • Develop accurate and appropriate procedural fluency
  • Develop strategies for problem solving
  • Develop mathematical reasoning
  • Develop a productive mathematical disposition
  • Develop the ability to make conjectures, model, and generalize
  • Develop the ability to communicate mathematically 

Unit 1:

Numbers Have Meaning


Timing

3-4 weeks


Objectives

1.D.1.1

1.D.1.2

1.D.1.3

  1.A.1.1*

  1.N.1.1*

  1.N.1.2*

  1.N.1.3*

     1.N.1.7*   

 

 

 

 

 

Why are numbers important?

  1. How can we understand numbers while exploring quantity? 

  2. How do we recognize numbers?

  3. What are meaningful ways to show numbers?

  4. How can we organize numbers? 

 

  1. The number of items in small groups (quantity) can be identified by seeing patterns and structure.
  2.  The number of items in a set (quantity) can be identified and communicated with numerals and graphs.
  3. Sets of objects can be compared by looking at real items, graphs, concrete representations, and numerals.

 

1.D.1.1 Collect, sort, and organize data in up to three categories using representations (e.g., tally marks, tables, Venn diagrams).

1.D.1.2 Use data to create picture and bar-type graphs to demonstrate one-to-one correspondence.

1.D.1.3 Draw conclusions from picture and bar-type graphs.

1.A.1.1 Identify, create, complete, and extend repeating, growing, and shrinking patterns with quantity, numbers, or shapes in a variety of real-world and mathematical contexts.

1.N.1.1 Recognize numbers to 20 without counting (subitize) the quantity of structured arrangements.

Clarification statement: Subitizing is defined as instantly recognizing the quantity of a set without having to count. “Subitizing” is not a vocabulary word and is not meant for student discussion at this age.

1.N.1.2 Use concrete representations to describe whole numbers between 10 and 100 in terms of tens and ones.

1.N.1.3 Read, write, discuss, and represent whole numbers up to 100. Representations may include numerals, addition and subtraction, pictures, tally marks, number lines and manipulatives, such as bundles of sticks and base 10 blocks.

1.N.1.7 Use knowledge of number relationships to locate the position of a given whole number on an open number line up to 20.

 

 

Unit 2:

Patterns with Numbers


Timing

4-5 weeks


Objectives

 1.A.1.1*

 1.N.1.1*

 1.N.1.2*

1.N.1.4

 1.N.1.5*

1.N.1.6

 1.N.1.7*

 1.N.1.8*

1.N.4.1

1.N.4.2

1.N.4.3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How can we recognize patterns in math?

  1. How do we communicate about patterns?
  2. How can we recognize patterns?
  3. In what ways can we represent patterns?
  4. How are patterns useful?

 

 
  1. Hundreds charts, number grid, and number lines are mathematical tools that display patterns with numbers.
  2. Patterns with numbers can increase and decrease in predictable amounts.
  3. Numbers can be compared using patterns.
  4.  Counting with coins follows a predictable pattern.

  

1.A.1.1 Identify, create, complete, and extend repeating, growing, and shrinking patterns with quantity, numbers, or shapes in a variety of real-world and mathematical contexts.

1.N.1.1 Recognize numbers to 20 without counting (subitize) the quantity of structured arrangements.

Clarification statement: Subitizing is defined as instantly recognizing the quantity of a set without having to count. “Subitizing” is not a vocabulary word and is not meant for student discussion at this age.

1.N.1.2 Use concrete representations to describe whole numbers between 10 and 100 in terms of tens and ones.

1.N.1.4 Count forward, with and without objects, from any given number up to 100 by 1s, 2s, 5s and 10s.
1.N.1.5 Find a number that is 10 more or 10 less than a given number up to 100.
1.N.1.6 Compare and order whole numbers from 0 to 100.
1.N.1.7 Use knowledge of number relationships to locate the position of a given whole number on an open number line up to 20.

1.N.1.8 Use objects to represent and use words to describe the relative size of numbers, such as more than, less than, and equal to.

1.N.4.1 Identifying pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters by name and value.
1.N.4.2 Write a number with the cent symbol to describe the value of a coin.
1.N.4.3 Determine the value of a collection of pennies, nickels, or dimes up to one dollar counting by ones, fives, or tens.

 

Unit 3:

Numbers can be used in many ways

Timing

3-4 Weeks


Objectives

1.N.1.1*

1.N.1.3*

1.N.2.1*

1.N.1.5*

1.N.1.7*

1.N.1.8*

 

 

 

What are some real world ways we use numbers?

 

  1. How can we use and organize numbers to solve problems?

  2. What does it mean to be equal?

  3. How can we solve problems with numbers and mathematical tools?

  4. What are some useful ways to think about numbers in mathematical situations? 

  1. Numbers can be used to solve real world problems.
  2. Numbers can be expressed in a variety of ways.
  3. Numbers can be expressed as equivalent (equal).
 

1.N.1.1 Recognize numbers to 20 without counting (subitize) the quantity of structured arrangements.

Clarification statement: Subitizing is defined as instantly recognizing the quantity of a set without having to count. “Subitizing” is not a vocabulary word and is not meant for student discussion at this age.

1.N.1.3 Read, write, discuss, and represent whole numbers up to 100. Representations may include numerals, addition and subtraction, pictures, tally marks, number lines and manipulatives, such as bundles of sticks and base 10 blocks.

1.N.2.1 Represent and solve real-world and mathematical problems using addition and subtraction up to ten.

1.N.1.5 Find a number that is 10 more or 10 less than a given number up to 100.
1.N.1.7 Use knowledge of number relationships to locate the position of a given whole number on an open number line up to 20.

1.N.1.8 Use objects to represent and use words to describe the relative size of numbers, such as more than, less than, and equal to.

 

Unit 4:

Problem Solving Builds Number Sense


Timing

4-5 Weeks


Objectives

 1.N.2.1*

1.N.2.2

1.N.2.3

 1.A.1.1*

 

 

 

How do we develop understanding of whole number relationships?

 

 

  1. How does adding and subtracting help us problem solve and build number sense?

  2. How do number relationships help us problem solve and build number sense?

  3. How can patterns in math help us problem solve and build number sense?

  4. What are other solutions to this problem?

 
  1. Problems can be solved flexibly, efficiently, and accurately.
  2. Addition and subtraction are related.
  3. Addition and subtraction follow patterns.
  4. Unknown numbers can be identified using relationships of numbers.
 

1.N.2.1 Represent and solve real-world and mathematical problems using addition and subtraction up to ten.

1.N.2.2 Determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true.

1.N.2.3 Demonstrate fluency with basic addition facts and related subtraction facts up to 10.

1.A.1.1 Identify, create, complete, and extend repeating, growing, and shrinking patterns with quantity, numbers, or shapes in a variety of real-world and mathematical contexts.

Unit 5:

Numbers and Shapes Can Be Shared Equally 

 


Timing

4-5 weeks


Objectives 

1.GM.1.1

1.GM.1.2

1.GM.1.3

1.GM.1.4

1.N.3.1

1.N.3.2

 

 

 

 

 

How can we see equal parts in shapes and numbers?

 

 

  1. How can we use comparisons to help us learn about shapes?

  2. How can attributes help us discover shapes in different ways?

  3. How are shapes a part of our world?

  4. How can we use numbers to describe shapes?

 
  1. Trapezoids and hexagons have unique characteristics.
  2. Shapes can be manipulated.
  3. 3D shapes are a part of our world and can be put together and taken apart.
  4. Shapes and objects can be partitioned or shared equally using representations.

1.GM.1.1Identify trapezoids and hexagons by pointing to the shape when given the name.

1.GM.1.2 Compose and decompose larger shapes using smaller two-dimensional shapes.

1.GM.1.3 Compose structures with three-dimensional shapes.

1.GM.1.4 Recognize three-dimensional shapes such as cubes, cones, cylinders, and spheres.

1.N.3.1 Partition a regular polygon using physical models and recognize when those parts are equal.

1.N.3.2 Partition (fair share) sets of objects into equal groupings.

 

 

Unit 6:

Measurement and Time


Timing

4-5 weeks


Objectives

1.GM.3.1

1.GM.2.1

1.GM.2.2

1.GM.2.3

1.GM.2.4

1.GM.2.5

 

 

 

 

 

Why do we need to measure?

 

 

 

  1. Why do we need measurement in our world?

  2. When should we use standard and nonstandard measurement?

  3. What tool should we use to measure and why?

  4. How can we compare the capacity of different containers?

 
  1. Time can be measured.
  2. Objects can be measured.
  3. A variety of tools can be used when measuring objects.
  4. Volume varies by container. 

1.GM.3.1 Tell time to the hour and half-hour (analog and digital).

1.GM.2.1 Use nonstandard and standard measuring tools to measure the length of objects to reinforce the continuous nature of linear measurement.

1.GM.2.2 Illustrate that the length of an object is the number of same-size units of length that, when laid end-to-end with no gaps or overlaps, reach from one end of the object to the other.
1.GM.2.3 Measure the same object/distance with units of two different lengths and describe how and why the measurements differ.

1.GM.2.4 Describe a length to the nearest whole unit using a number and a unit.

1.GM.2.5 Use standard and nonstandard tools to identify volume/capacity. Compare and sort containers that hold more, less, or the same amount.

 

Culminating Unit 

 


Timing

4 weeks


Objectives 

1.N.1.1

1.N.1.2

1.N.1.3

1.N.1.5

1.N.1.6

1.N.1.7

1.N.1.8

 1.N.2.1

1.N.2.2

1.N.2.3

1.A.1.1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How can we apply what we have learned using the math frameworks?

 

 

  1. How can we extend our knowledge of number relationships?

  2. How can we expand problem solving in mathematical situations?

  3. How can we use place value to extend number patterns and number sense? 

  1. Extending Number Relationships
  2. Building Number Strategies
  3. Extending Place Value
  4. Communicating Mathematics 

1.N.1.1 Recognize numbers to 20 without counting (subitize) the quantity of structured arrangements.

Clarification statement: Subitizing is defined as instantly recognizing the quantity of a set without having to count. “Subitizing” is not a vocabulary word and is not meant for student discussion at this age.

1.N.1.2 Use concrete representations to describe whole numbers between 10 and 100 in terms of tens and ones

1.N.1.3 Read, write, discuss, and represent whole numbers up to 100. Representations may include numerals, addition and subtraction, pictures, tally marks, number lines and manipulatives, such as bundles of sticks and base 10 blocks.

1.N.1.5 Find a number that is 10 more or 10 less than a given number up to 100.

1.N.1.6 Compare and order whole numbers from 0 to 100.
1.N.1.7 Use knowledge of number relationships to locate the position of a given whole number on an open number line up to 20.

1.N.1.8 Use objects to represent and use words to describe the relative size of numbers, such as more than, less than, and equal to.

1.N.2.1 Represent and solve real-world and mathematical problems using addition and subtraction up to ten.

1.N.2.2 Determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true.

1.N.2.3 Demonstrate fluency with basic addition facts and related subtraction facts up to 10.

1.A.1.1 Identify, create, complete, and extend repeating, growing, and shrinking patterns with quantity, numbers, or shapes in a variety of real-world and mathematical contexts.

 

 

 

 

Distance Learning Resources/
Supplemental Activities
How can students develop and show evidence of understanding?     Multiple objectives are covered in this material. These math tasks are designed to enhance current curriculum and support distance learning.

 


Introduction to the OKMath Framework

1st Grade Introduction

 

 

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